STATS: Women’s County Championship – Batting Rankings

Although Suzie Bates was arguably a bit less important to Hampshire this season than last – scoring 34% of their runs this year, compared with 38% in 2017 – she was still The Big Gear in the machine that clinched the County Championship last weekend. She was also the only player in Div 1 to score a century… and she scored two of them! Unsurprisingly, then, she tops our batting rankings.

At No. 2, Emma Lamb had another good season for Lancashire, opening the batting with Eve Jones who also makes the top 10. Lancashire’s problem is that they don’t have much else below them – between the two of them they scored almost half the county’s runs this season.

Middlesex’s Maia Bouchier had a breakthrough season – she spent last winter working hard in New Zealand, and seems to have come back with a little something extra about her – England really should be looking at her when they review the Academy squads this winter.

In Div 2, Kirstie White was the leading run scorer, but just pipped in the rankings by Nat Sciver after the England all-rounder’s crazy 180 off 98 balls against Derbyshire – doubtless not the most challenging bowling she’ll face this summer, but you can only play what they put in front of you, as the saying goes!

Div 1

Player Played Runs H/S S/R
1. Suzie Bates (Hampshire) 6 358 148 86.06
2. Emma Lamb (Lancashire) 7 339 91 81.69
3. Tammy Beaumont (Kent) 4 261 98 73.94
4. Amy Jones (Warwickshire) 5 193 68 99.48
5. Lauren Winfield (Yorkshire) 4 197 69 90.78
6. Maia Bouchier (Middlesex) 6 172 76 75.44
7. Alice Davidson-Richards (Kent) 7 223 61* 58.07
8. Leigh Kasperek (Yorkshire) 6 179 68 69.65
9. Thea Brookes (Warwickshire) 6 168 70* 66.93
10. Eve Jones (Lancashire) 7 193 61* 55.78

Div 2

Player Played Runs H/S S/R
1. Nat Sciver (Surrey) 4 273 180* 156
2. Kirstie White (Surrey) 7 331 94 70.28
3. Bryony Smith (Surrey) 7 256 119* 86.49
4. Gabby Basketter (Wales) 6 269 78 74.1
5. Sarah Taylor (Sussex) 3 200 88 93.46
6. Heather Knight (Berkshire) 3 190 105 89.62
7. Bess Heath (Derbyshire) 7 210 108 77.78
8. Georgia Adams (Sussex) 6 207 106 74.19
9. Rachel Priest (Wales) 6 174 88 86.57
10. Georgia Hennessy (Devon) 6 174 58 66.16

Batting Ranking = Runs * Strike Rate

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STATS: Women’s County Championship – Bowling Rankings

Far and away the leading bowler in Division 1 of the County Championship was Notts’ Kirstie Gordon. In her 3rd season for Notts, since moving down from Scotland, she took 23 wickets, with a best of 5-18 against Warwickshire, which included Nos. 1, 2 and 3 in the Warwickshire batting lineup.

The next highest wicket taker in Div 1 was Fi Morris, with 15. The former Berkshire player returned to county cricket with Hampshire after taking a break last summer, and her contributions with ball and bat were an important part of why Hampshire won the County Championship.

After ranking 2nd in 2016, but missing most of last season, Katie Thompson came back with 11 wickets at a very economical 1.7 for Yorkshire.

Meanwhile in Div 2, the standout performers were Devon’s Hazelle Garton with 22 wickets, and Sussex and England Academy’s Freya Davies, whose 6-10 to bowl Derbyshire out for 65 was the leading return in the County Championship this season.

Div 1

Player Played Wickets Best Economy
1. Kirstie Gordon (Nottinghamshire) 7 23 5-18 2.63
2. Katie Thompson (Yorkshire) 6 11 5-14 1.7
3. Anya Shrubsole (Somerset) 4 9 5-15 1.58
4. Fi Morris (Hampshire) 7 15 4-12 3
5. Leigh Kasperek (Yorkshire) 6 12 3-19 2.79
6. Katie George (Hampshire) 7 11 4-13 2.61
7. Sophie Ecclestone (Lancashire) 5 9 4-16 2.35
8. Suzie Bates (Hampshire) 6 10 3-24 2.95
9. Megan Belt (Kent) 7 11 3-15 3.39
10. Laura Marsh (Kent) 5 11 3-18 3.41

Div 2

Player Played Wickets Best Economy
1. Hazelle Garton (Devon) 7 22 5-18 1.98
2. Freya Davies (Sussex) 6 13 6-10 1.85
3. Georgia Elwiss (Sussex) 4 10 4-22 1.79
4. Bryony Smith (Surrey) 7 14 5-33 2.6
5. Steph Hutchins (Devon) 7 13 4-35 2.5
6. Tara Norris (Sussex) 6 10 3-17 2.18
7. Emma Walker (Berkshire) 6 10 3-16 2.33
8. Linsey Smith (Sussex) 5 7 3-28 1.75
9. Gabby Basketter (Wales) 6 11 3-13 3.05
10. Eva Gray (Surrey) 7 11 2-8 3.06

Bowling Ranking = Wickets / Economy

ANALYSIS: Should Keepers Stand In Front Of The Stumps For Run Outs?

There is a fascinating video on the ECB’s web site which asks (and attempts to answer) the question: Should keepers stand in front or behind the stumps for run outs? (HT Joe Ashdown)

The coaches at the ECB’s performance centre up in Loughborough set up their cameras and stopwatches, and with the help of Hawk-Eye and a reconfigured bowling machine acting as the fielder, attempted to get a definitive answer.

You can watch the whole thing at the link above, but the TLDW* is that standing in front of the stumps is… well… it depends!!

The key to it… and the video actually slightly talks-around this fairly simple point… is that you have to know exactly where your stumps are – not vaguely; not roughly; but exactly!

There are two reasons for this:

  1. You need to know if the ball is already going on to directly hit the stumps, in which case you need to basically leave it alone – nothing beats the speed of the ball through the air, and if you interrupt it then you lose all the benefit of those few milliseconds you bought from standing in front.
  2. If the ball is missing the stumps, you need to be perfectly positioned to guide it on in a single movement – if you can’t do this in one smooth, gliding arc, then it actually becomes two movements and again the advantage is lost as the batsman makes their ground.

What the video shows fairly conclusively is knowing exactly where your stumps are, and perfecting the art of guiding the missing ball back on in a single arc, is really hard – even for a seasoned pro, it takes years of practice. The video’s final conclusion is that, even in the professional game, “normal” fielders at the bowler’s end (typically the bowler himself) should always stand behind the stumps; but that the very best ‘keepers could indeed buy some advantage by standing in front.

This has some interesting implications for young ‘keepers in the women’s domestic game, as it touches on the slightly awkward question of what the Women’s County Championship and Kia Super League are for? Are they competitions in their own right, where winning is all? Or does that come secondary to their other role as nurseries for future England players?

England’s Academy and pathway coaches are clearly coaching players to stand in front – and rightly so, because one day England will need one of them to step into the gloves [Ed: err…?] of Sarah Taylor.

But for a young ‘keeper playing the County Championship or KSL, if the goal is to win “this” match right now, they should probably be standing behind, because this is the optimal choice unless you’ve had the years of professional practice to perfect the techniques required to stand in front… which the young (at best, semi-pro) ‘keepers in domestic cricket have not!

It isn’t only wicket keepers who face these dilemmas. Should a young fast bowler, hoping one day to be bowling out the Aussies in the Women’s Ashes, focus on pace, even if it means conceding a few wides or no balls? Her England pathway coach would no doubt say yes; but her county coach might well prefer her to take a foot off the gas and keep the runs down in “this” match going on right now!

To be fair, these same issues arise as well in The Other Game but that is what they have 2nd XI cricket for. We have no real equivalent, and so the County Champs and Super League play both roles – competition and nursery – and that means there is no easy answer.

————————

* TLDW – Too Long; Didn’t Watch

The 2017 CRICKETher Cricketmas Quiz

Twelve months; twelve questions; no Googling!!

INTERVIEW: Scotland’s Kathryn and Sarah Bryce Head to WBBL

Jake Perry Reports

Two of the brightest stars in the Scottish game will be rubbing shoulders with the best in the world as participants in the 2017/18 Rebel Women’s Big Bash League Rookie Placement Programme. Sisters Kathryn and Sarah Bryce will head to Australia to take up two-week placements with WBBL franchises Adelaide Strikers and Hobart Hurricanes in the third edition of the innovative joint venture between Cricket Australia and the ICC.

Each of the eight nominees is given the opportunity to experience women’s cricket at its very highest level, and with the added possibility of being called into the tournament itself in the event of an injury to a contracted player, too, the initiative opens up a unique window onto the elite world.

Both Kathryn and Sarah are looking forward to the experience.

“It was so exciting to get everything confirmed,” said Sarah. “It was unexpected for me at least and the family are very proud to have us both involved.”

“I’m really looking forward to visiting Tasmania,” she continued. “Being around such high-quality players and getting to see how they go about their training and everything else is really exciting.”

Whilst Sarah has been selected for the first time it will be a second trip in two years for Scotland vice-captain Kathryn, and the twenty year-old all-rounder is relishing the opportunity to be part of the programme once again.

“Having as much exposure as possible to that professional set-up helps my game a lot,” she said. “It is experience that I take back into my training and tournament play with Scotland.”

“[Last year] gave me an insight into the preparation and hard work that goes into cricket at this level. It’s not just what happens in games and in training, it’s the whole thought process that goes into it as well.”

Kathryn was placed with Melbourne Stars during the last campaign.

“I was given a bit of time to settle in then I fitted into all the training and gym schedules,” she said. “Last year I went along to watch some of the other WBBL games in Melbourne, too. The Renegades were playing as well as the Stars so I went and watched them and got to know a few of the girls, went out to dinner with them and so on.”

“I was living in the same hotel as other international players so I got to spend a lot of time with them as well. Just being in that environment and the routine of training, gym and everything else taught me a lot.”

“I had a couple of training sessions out on the MCG, too, which was fantastic. That outfield and the indoor nets are something else.”

“In Adelaide there is the main Adelaide Oval but I’m not entirely sure what facilities we’ll be using,” continued Kathryn. “But wherever it is it’ll just be good to be playing some outdoor cricket at this time of year!”

“I don’t know a huge amount about what it’s going to be like but I know the facilities and the coaches are going to be of a great standard,” added Sarah. “It will be interesting to see what resources they have and how they use them.”

The news crowns a memorable year for both players. As well as winning her fiftieth Scotland cap Kathryn scored 241 runs at 30.13 for Warwickshire in her first season in the Women’s County Championship, adding a 49-ball 73* in the T20 Championship for good measure.

Seventeen year-old Sarah also made great strides after taking over from Lorna Jack behind the stumps as both players helped Scotland to the ICC Women’s World T20 Global Qualifier.

“It’s been a really good season,” said Sarah. “Going to Sri Lanka at the beginning of the year for the [ICC Women’s World Cup] Qualifier and playing against teams like South Africa was incredible. Putting yourself up against those sorts of players was a challenge we all relished.”

“I think that having both Kathryn and me at the WBBL shows that the women’s game in Scotland is really on the up. In the past a couple of players were relied upon a lot whereas that’s definitely changing now. These days the whole team is contributing which says a lot about how we have progressed.”

“Speaking personally taking over the gloves has been great for me,” Sarah continued. “I’m just trying to keep improving all aspects of my game. Having Kathryn doing so well [has been an inspiration] and it’s nice to be able to follow in her footsteps to the WBBL this year.”

The end of the placement will not be the last Sarah sees of Australia this winter, either.

“I’ll be spending three months at the Perth Cricket Academy after the Big Bash so that will get me into a good routine of how to go about training and fitness and so on too.”

“The whole winter is going to be a great experience and both of us will be looking to bring back as much knowledge to Scotland as we can.”

—–

Jake Perry writes on Scottish cricket for Cricket Scotland and Cricket 365 and has contributed to ESPNcricinfo and All Out Cricket.
Twitter: @jperry_cricket
Facebook: Jake Perry Cricket

STATS: Women’s County Championship 2017: Batting Rankings

Div 1 Stats – Other Divisions Are Available!

The Women’s County Championship can be an unforgiving place to be a batsman – matches are mostly played on used club pitches, often with huge boundaries (in contrast to KSL) and unforgiving outfields where the ball will quickly run out of puff. So if you are thinking these numbers look low… perhaps they are, but there’s a reason!

Sophie Devine tops the 2017 batting rankings, largely thanks to one of the greatest innings in the history of the Women’s County Championship – 122 off 78 balls for Warwickshire versus Middlesex. (Incidentally, this was the only century scored in Div 1 this season.)

Middlesex’s own Beth Morgan comes in at No. 2 – six years after retiring from England duty, she still looks a classy player, with the numbers and consistency to back it up – having reached double-figures in all 7 innings, with a high of 80 against Yorkshire.

The leading run-scorer this season was Notts’ veteran skipper Sonia Odedra with 253 – including carrying her bat for the 79* which deprived Yorkshire of the County Championship title in the final game. (Notts won the match, finishing on 178-4 – if they had finished on 178-5, Yorkshire would have got the one extra bonus point they needed to win the title.)

Batting Played Runs Strike Rate
1. Sophie Devine 4 159 135.9
2. Beth Morgan 7 245 71.85
3. Amy Jones 3 136 127.1
4. Sonia Odedra 7 253 63.57
5. Danielle Wyatt 4 163 94.22
6. Amy Satterthwaite 7 242 63.35
7. Rachel Priest 5 146 97.99
8. Katherine Brunt 2 146 94.19
9. Evelyn Jones 6 218 59.73
10. Hollie Armitage 6 192 54.55
11. Marie Kelly 7 140 72.54
12. Anna Nicholls 7 140 70.71
13. Georgia Hennessy 6 152 61.79
14. Sarah Taylor 3 118 69.41
15. Catherine Dalton 5 94 87.04
16. Kathryn Bryce 7 127 60.19
17. Sophie Ecclestone 7 100 70.92
18. Danielle Hazell 3 98 72.06
19. Alice Davidson-Richards 5 140 49.47
20. Lissy Macleod 7 104 65

Batting Ranking = Runs * Strike Rate

STATS: Women’s County Championship 2017: Bowling Rankings

Div 1 Stats – Other Divisions Are Available!

The star turn of this season’s Women’s County Championship was undoubtedly Sophie Ecclestone, with a massive 27 wickets in 7 games for title winners Lancashire. (By comparison last season’s top-ranked bowler – Kent’s Megan Belt – took just 16 wickets.) Ecclestone took two 5fers, including 6-12 in the crucial final match of the season, which catapulted Lancashire over Warwickshire and Yorkshire to the title.

Meanwhile, Yorkshire leg-spinner Katie Levick eased past one “C.M. Edwards” into 3rd place in the “All Time” list of Div 1 wicket-takers, with another 21 wickets this season.

In a season more than ever dominated by spinners, only one fast bowler made the top 10 – Holly Huddleston. Huddleston might not have had a great KSL (though Finals Day is still to come) but 50-over cricket is really her game, and she showed it again in this year’s County Champs.

One to watch for the future is Berkshire’s 17-year-old off-spinner Emma Walker, who made the list at No. 11 in her debut season, with 11 wickets including a 5fer against Middlesex. (She also top-scored for Berkshire in their last match against Kent!)

Bowling Played Wickets Economy
1. Sophie Ecclestone 7 27 2.76
2. Katie Levick 7 21 2.68
3. Anisha Patel 7 14 2.93
4. Kirstie Gordon 7 13 2.89
5. Sophia Dunkley 4 11 2.56
6. Kaitie Thompson 7 10 2.48
7. Linsey Smith 4 9 2.34
8. Rebecca Grundy 7 10 2.76
9. Jodie Dibble 7 12 3.73
10. Holly Huddleston 4 9 2.8
11. Emma Walker 6 11 3.44
12. Liz Russell 3 10 3.41
13. Sophie Munro 4 10 3.58
14. Ellen Burt 7 10 3.62
15. Rachel Dickinson 7 9 3.3
16. Teresa Graves 5 7 2.86
17. Alice Davidson-Richards 5 8 3.28
18. Megan Belt 7 9 3.76
19. Natalie Brown 7 6 2.57
20. Izzy Westbury 5 11 4.87

Bowling Ranking = Wickets / Economy